Tools for Digital Humanities Scholarly Innovation

knightESRIIncreasingly, humanities scholars are exploring their research materials using spatial and temporal cues. Plotting when and where events took place, helps to expose patterns previously hidden and to suggest their own hypotheses for further investigation. These simple and powerful tools leverage and mine aspects of your own data to aid in analysis and presentation of your humanities research data. They create innovative, rich storytelling environments that challenge conventional means of communication. In this short seminar participants will explore 4 novel tools that can bring new dimensions to your existing research plans.
TimelineJS is an open-source tool that enables anyone to build visually,rich, interactive timelines. Beginners can create a timeline using nothing more than a Google spreadsheet. Experts can use their JSON skills to create custom installations.
JuxtaposeJS helps storytellers compare two pieces of similar media, including photos, and gifs. It’s ideal for highlighting then/now stories that explain slow changes over time (grown of a city skyline, regrowth of a forest, etc.) or before/after stories that show the impact of single dramatic events (natural disasters, protests, wars, etc.).
It is free, easy to use, and works on all devices. All you need to get started are links to the images you’d like to compare.
StoryMapJS is a free tool to help you tell stories on the web that highlight the locations of a series of events. It is a new tool, yet stable in our development environment, and it has a friendly authoring tool.
ESRI StoryMaps combine interactive maps and multimedia content into elegant user experiences. They make it easy for you to harness the power of maps to tell your stories.
This seminar would be of interest to wide side variety of scholars in the arts, humanities and social sciences that work with digital objects currently or are considering their applicability to a larger research project.
The structure of this seminar is such that no prior experience with any of these digital tools is presumed and is intended to provide some background in what these tools might offer so that participants can judge whether it would be benefit to investigate them more deeply.

Timeline JS Example

This example uses the datafile available via: GoogleDoc Data file

It is constructed as a quick demonstration of the types of media that can be rapidly deployed using the Timeline JS tool from Knight Labs at Northwestern University

Storymap JS Example

This example uses the datafile available via: GoogleDoc Data file

It is constructed as a quick demonstration of the types of media that can be rapidly deployed using the Storymap JS tool from Knight Labs at Northwestern University

The Presentation

QUB Library 19 October 2015 Scholarly Innovation

Additional Resources

Here are a selection of additional tools and readings that will enhance your experience with the tools demonstrated during this seminar. As always please be in touch if I can be of any assistance with your own scholarly endeavours.

Here is a great tutorial on ‘How to create an immersive Gigapixel image in Storymap‘ contributed by Dr Fiona Clark

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