Calendar

Mar
23
Mon
Using Google Tools for Digital Humanities Scholarship @ Training Auditorium
Mar 23 @ 11:00 – 13:00
Although there is no charge for this event, spaces are limited so you must register in advance for this event to guarantee a seat. Please register for this event.
Google-servicesGoogle have created a huge number of products and services that most of us have made part of our everyday life. From their web search engine to Gmail and Google Maps chances are you are making use of their products as part of your own scholarly existence. However, it may surprise you to find out just how many Google services exist that you may well  not know about. That’s what this seminar is all about. Introducing some of the lesser known, but potentially even more useful tools to scholars such as the particularly focused Google Fusion Tables and Trendalyzer to the simple but powerful Google Keep among others.
This seminar will explore a number of these tools as well as more well know ones such as Google Scholar or Google Sites that offer useful specific functionality for humanities scholars.
The structure of this seminar is such that no prior experience with any of these digital tools or with Google tools is presumed and is intended to provide simple demonstration of what these tools might offer so that participants can judge whether it would be benefit to investigate them more deeply.
No advance preparation for this seminar is necessary.
Although there is no charge for this event, spaces are limited so you must register in advance for this event to guarantee a seat. Please register for this event.
Apr
20
Mon
Requirements Engineering for Humanities Scholarship @ Training Auditorium
Apr 20 @ 11:00 – 16:00
Requirements EngineeringAs the field of digital humanities has evolved, one of the biggest challenges has been getting the appropriate technical expertise to make traditional humanities projects successful. At its core this is a communications exercise. However, to communicate effectively involved been able to effectively translate, define and find clarity in your own mind.
How can you define your own project goals and objectives for yourself and to communicate with others?
This workshop is designed to help you clearly delineate your own digital project goals and objectives, account for the various stakeholders (some of which you may be unaware of), document and communicate these effectively to participants outside of your own area of research. Basically, it comes down to finding the means to get the right information, presented in the right manner, to the key people involved in your potential or real digital humanities project. Although this workshop goes hand-in-hand with the Digital Project Management Success workshop we also offer, these are complementary and not co-requisite.
At the end of this workshop participants will be capable of defining their project in simple and more universally appreciated terms, be cognisant of the varied demands that might be placed on the digital project by users, be capable of creating and delivering professional and effective Project Case Documentation.
Although attendance at this event is free, as places are limited please register for this event by clicking the register button to the right or via: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/requirements-engineering-for-humanities-scholarship-tickets-15253641051
May
15
Fri
Introduction to Text Encoding with TEI @ Teaching Room 7 (TR 7), The Graduate School
May 15 @ 10:00 – 17:00
Although attendance at this event is free, registration is essential. Please register at the link to the right above or at: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/introduction-to-text-encoding-with-tei-tickets-16709933862

The “Introduction to Text Encoding with TEI” workshop offers a condensed introduction to scholarly text encoding within a humanities or digital humanities context. This workshop is designed to serve students in the humanities who are interested in using text encoding as a scholarly tool. Through a combination of discussion and practical experimentation, this workshop offers participants an opportunity to examine the significance of text encoding as a scholarly practice.

This workshop will commence by providing an introduction to text encoding for beginners. Participants will learn about the markup of text using XML (Extensible Markup Language). Essential concepts of text encoding will be explored and connected with important issues of disciplinary methods and digital representation. Particular attention will be paid to the markup of text using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines, an elaborate complex language for representing digital scholarship, and the de facto standard for rigor in digital texts. More information about the TEI can be found on the TEI Consortium Website.

Through a combination of introductory presentations, discussions and practice with hands-on exercises, participants will learn the basic techniques for creating XML-encoded texts. While working through the essentials of TEI markup, participants will consider how markup languages create meaning and support scholarship in the digital age.

This workshop will be of interest to individuals who are contemplating embarking on a text-encoding project (using primarily print and text-based material), or for those who wish to understand the practicalities of encoding in XML using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. 

This workshop will address the following topics:

  • Text Markup Languages as an instrument for digital humanities scholarship
  • What is markup? What is its function? Why is it important?
  • Basics components of XML: elements, attributes, document structure, and schemas.
  • What is the role of standards and the TEI? Why do we need markup languages?
  • Basics of TEI Markup
  • Issues of representation/Issues of disciplinarity
  • Metadata and contextual information
  • How to use text-encoded information in a digital environment. 

No prior experience of XML is required for this workshop, but the workshop will move quickly through the basics.

Participants will need to bring a wireless enable laptop with the latest version of Oxygen XML Editor. A 30-day free trial version is available on the Oxygen XML Editor website. Participants may bring a sample of material for encoding to be used and discussed in the breakout session. 

Oct
19
Mon
Tools for Digital Scholarly Innovation: TimelineJS, JuxtaposeJS, StoryMapJS, ESRI StoryMaps @ Graduate School TR6 (GRS/01/009)
Oct 19 @ 11:00 – 13:00

Are Time and Place part of your research?
Do You want to Explore Innovative Ways of Visualising Your Research to Open New Doors for Understanding for You or your Audience?This is the workshop you want to be at.

Although there is no charge for this event, spaces are limited so you must register in advance for this event to guarantee a seat. Please register for this event.
knightESRIIncreasingly, humanities scholars are exploring their research materials using spatial and temporal cues. Plotting when and where events took place, helps to expose patterns previously hidden and to suggest their own hypotheses for further investigation. These simple and powerful tools leverage and mine aspects of your own data to aid in analysis and presentation of your humanities research data. They create innovative, rich storytelling environments that challenge conventional means of communication. In this short seminar participants will explore 4 novel tools that can bring new dimensions to your existing research plans.
TimelineJS is an open-source tool that enables anyone to build visually,rich, interactive timelines. Beginners can create a timeline using nothing more than a Google spreadsheet. Experts can use their JSON skills to create custom installations.
JuxtaposeJS helps storytellers compare two pieces of similar media, including photos, and gifs. It’s ideal for highlighting then/now stories that explain slow changes over time (grown of a city skyline, regrowth of a forest, etc.) or before/after stories that show the impact of single dramatic events (natural disasters, protests, wars, etc.).
It is free, easy to use, and works on all devices. All you need to get started are links to the images you’d like to compare.
StoryMapJS is a free tool to help you tell stories on the web that highlight the locations of a series of events. It is a new tool, yet stable in our development environment, and it has a friendly authoring tool.
ESRI StoryMaps combine interactive maps and multimedia content into elegant user experiences. They make it easy for you to harness the power of maps to tell your stories.
This seminar would be of interest to wide side variety of scholars in the arts, humanities and social sciences that work with digital objects currently or are considering their applicability to a larger research project.
The structure of this seminar is such that no prior experience with any of these digital tools is presumed and is intended to provide some background in what these tools might offer so that participants can judge whether it would be benefit to investigate them more deeply.
No advance preparation for this seminar is necessary.
Although there is no charge for this event, spaces are limited so you must register in advance for this event to guarantee a seat. Please register for this event.
Jan
25
Mon
How to Put Your Data on the Map: Geospatial Visualisation for the Humanities @ Training Room 2
Jan 25 @ 11:00 – 13:00
Although there is no charge for this event, spaces are limited so you must register in advance for this event to guarantee a seat. Please register for this event.

dcc-housing-monitoring-tool1Mapping your data can help to provide new insights on your research findings. However, many scholars are put off by the steep learning curve demanded by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) such as ArcGIS from ESRI. New and simple tools have become available that offer sophisticated output without extensive training. In fact, tools such as Google Maps, Google Earth, Open Street Map among others can offer immediate returns in a matter of hours where tasks in the past required, weeks, months and even years of training.

In this seminar we will explore a variety of these newly accessible tools and consider a variety of inspiring examples of how humanities scholars today are using these tools in their own research.
The structure of this seminar is such that no prior experience with any of these digital tools is presumed and is intended to provide some background in what these tools might offer so that participants can judge whether it would be benefit to investigate them more deeply.
No advance preparation for this seminar is necessary.
Although there is no charge for this event, spaces are limited so you must register in advance for this event to guarantee a seat. Please register for this event.

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Feb
12
Fri
Requirements Engineering for Humanities Scholarship @ Training Room 2
Feb 12 @ 10:30 – 15:30
Requirements EngineeringAs the field of digital humanities has evolved, one of the biggest challenges has been getting the appropriate technical expertise to make traditional humanities projects successful. At its core this is a communications exercise. However, to communicate effectively involved been able to effectively translate, define and find clarity in your own mind.
How can you define your own project goals and objectives for yourself and to communicate with others?
This workshop is designed to help you clearly delineate your own digital project goals and objectives, account for the various stakeholders (some of which you may be unaware of), document and communicate these effectively to participants outside of your own area of research. Basically, it comes down to finding the means to get the right information, presented in the right manner, to the key people involved in your potential or real digital humanities project. Although this workshop goes hand-in-hand with the Digital Project Management Success workshop we also offer, these are complementary and not co-requisite.
At the end of this workshop participants will be capable of defining their project in simple and more universally appreciated terms, be cognisant of the varied demands that might be placed on the digital project by users, be capable of creating and delivering professional and effective Project Case Documentation.
Although attendance at this event is free, as places are limited please register for this event by clicking the register button to the right or via: EventBrite
Mar
4
Fri
Constructing Digital Exhibitions with Omeka @ Training Room 2
Mar 4 @ 10:00 – 13:00

omekaBadgeWhether for your own use or to make your research outcomes available for a wider audience, increasingly scholarship in the humanities involves developing a narrative around collections of digital assets. This workshop will provide participants with a working knowledge of the choices available to share and disseminate knowledge by collecting and developing narratives around digital objects. During this workshop we will hands-on with the Omeka platform from the Roy Rosenzweig Centre for New Media and History. Omeka is a particularly powerful, standards driven tool for managing collections of digitised objects in an interactive and user-driven fashion.

Although attendance at this event is free, as places are limited please register for this event by clicking the register button to the right or via: Eventbrite

Apr
18
Mon
Relationship Mapping: Visual Network Analysis for Humanities Scholarship @ Training Auditorium
Apr 18 @ 11:00 – 14:00

Relationship-MappingIncreasingly digital scholarship is expanding to look not just at discrete objects but to better understand the relationships between persons, places and things. A popular way of discovering patters and deriving new knowledge about these relationships involved visual appreciation of the relationship between data and objects and ultimately the real world phenomenon that they proxy for or abstractly represent.

In this hands-on workshops we will explore a number of tools, with emphasis on using Gephi to explore relationships and understand the terminology and processes involved in rendering your data to aid analysis and understanding. This workshop assumed no prior experience with relationship mapping or with network visualisation tools. It is intended to provide a soft introduction to graph theory, and network visualisation techniques so that you might discover unique ways that it may aid your scholarship.

Although there is no cost to attend this workshop, spaces are limited so we ask that you register in advance at:Eventbrite.

Jul
4
Mon
Using Trello for Team Process Management @ Specials Meeting Room
Jul 4 @ 11:00 – 12:30

An introduction to using Trello as a tool for managing team processes along with a brief exploration of how it can be easily integrated with other productivity tools.

Links:

Presentation: Introduction to Trello

May
4
Thu
Northern Bridge: Troubled Pasts Workshop @ McClay Library, Queen's University Belfast
May 4 – May 5 all-day
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